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Divine Mercy

Icon Reproduction

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Item Number Description Price Quantity
MCQ101 6" X 10" ICON MATTED TO 11" X 14"

$12.00

ICQ001 4" X 6" ICON ON WOOD

$13.95

ICQ101 6" X 10" ICON ON WOOD

$23.95

ICQ201 8" X 13" ICON ON WOOD

$34.95

ICQ301 10" X 16" ICON ON WOOD

$50.95


Description

On February 22, 1931, Saint Faustina Kowalska experienced a vision of Christ dressed in white with two beams of colored light shining forth from His heart. Christ told the saint to paint what she saw, that people might venerate Him and know of the Divine Mercy ready for all who turn to Him. This icon was written by Father Pachomius Meade, O.S.B., a monk of Conception Abbey.

Wood-mounted icons are on 3/4" thick solid hardwood, typically poplar, with a tee-slot milled in the back for easy hanging on the wall. The wood is stained a traditional icon red, in keeping with Byzantine tradition. (Ancient icon board edges were frequently coated with red bole, a form of clay). Each wood-mounted icon comes with a descriptive pamphlet explaining the symbolism and history of the image.


Please allow 5-10 business days for orders of 20 or more icons.


Double-matted prints use an inner mat of navy blue with a 1/4" reveal and an off-white outer mat that will blend with any decor.


Our icon designs are also available in sanctuary-size enlargements up to 38 inches wide. The latest technology enables enlargement without sacrificing quality. Call 800-889-0105 for pricing and ordering.

Image Origins

Shortly after entering the convent, the Polish nun Sister Faustina Kowalska began to have mystical visions of Jesus. She recorded all of these in her diary. On February 22, 1931, she experienced a vision in which she saw the Lord dressed in white while two beams of colored light shone forth from his heart. Christ told the saint to paint what she saw, that people might venerate him and know of the Divine Mercy ready for all who turn to him. Sister Faustina had several artists attempt to portray this image of Christ’s mercy according to her description. None of the depictions ever met with her satisfaction; thus today, while the image of Divine Mercy is instantly recognizable, subtle variations persist based on various representations of her account of the apparition. In 2000 Pope John Paul II canonized Sister Faustina as the first saint of the new millennium. He proclaimed the second Sunday of Easter “Divine Mercy Sunday.” The Divine Mercy Chaplet is linked to this image of God’s love and compassion for all who turn to him. Since Poland borders Russia, the styling of this Divine Mercy icon has an eastern flavor. It contains all the imagery described by St. Faustina, done in Byzantine-Slav style. It borrows imagery from icons of the Transfiguration in order to communicate the idea of heavenly light.


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Icon Reproductions
Year of Mercy